Esteesee

by Ange Hardy

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1.
There once was a woodman, Leoni, Could fell and saw with a lusty arm. Took to the woods and by a tree Found an abandoned child. He took that baby under wing, Wrapped in mosses lined with thistle-beards, Took him home from the huge round beam By the purse of the good Lord reared. Gone is he! taken to the sea Never again to see his father Gone is he! taken to the sea Never again to see his father! Gone is he! taken to the sea Never again to see his father; gone! So the babe grew up did whistle and sing Oh such a pretty boy! most untouchable! Would not learn, would not come in For out in the woods did play. And out in the woods was a grey haired man, And all through woodland lined with thistle-beards Taught that youth to write with the pen All through to his twentieth year. {chorus} So many a book did the young man read Filled his mind with unlawful thoughts. One day as he stood with his Lord The ground beneath them shook. Well the earth did heave and the earth did groan The wall fell down and it near fell on them, All in a fright he came undone. Confession: judgement comes! {chorus} The youth was cast into a hole And it broke the heart of poor Leoni, So all at once that boy he stole Sent him across the sea. But the boy he turned; mad did go! News it came to poor Leoni: He seized a boat, set sail alone, Died a savage man. {chorus}
2.
02:10
My Captain you will never be free For the call of the water binds you, Take my liege and go with speed And hope good fortunes find you. Up the mast and up the sails And down to the Captain’s quarters. Down the rum and talk of home But never of the Captain’s daughters! My Captain you will never be free For the winds control and guide you, The ice and mist can shape and twist The tale you leave behind you. So up the mast and up the sails And down to the Captain’s quarters. Down the rum and talk of home But never of the Captain’s daughters! My Captain you will never be free Although the blood sun guises For all your four times fifty men Can’t change the way she rises. Up the mast and up the sails And down to the Captain’s quarters Down the rum and talk of home But never of the Captain’s daughters! My Captain you will never be free For the call of the water binds you, Take my liege and go with speed And hope good fortunes find you. Up the mast and up the sails And down to the Captain’s quarters Down the rum and talk of home But never of the Captain’s daughters!
3.
Four times fifty men did lie With heavy thump nor groan nor sigh, I can’t look away, Lord knows I’ve tried, From the curse of a dead man’s eye. All in a hot and a copper sky Parched only dust in my lungs so dry, I drink of the blood from my arms to cry for the curse of a dead man’s eye. All at my feet did the dead men lie Lay like a load on my weary eye, Alone, all alone, yet I could not die for the curse of a dead man’s eye. The many men, so beautiful! And they all dead did lie: And a thousand thousand slimy things Lived on; and so did I. All but the dead men rot and blight The rotting flesh did reek awry, And all but the souls of the dead men lie for the curse of a dead man’s eye. All at my feet did the dead men lie Lay like a load on my weary eye, Alone, all alone, yet I could not die for the curse of a dead man’s eye. The many men, so beautiful! And they all dead did lie: And a thousand thousand slimy things Lived on; and so did I. Four times fifty men did lie With heavy thump nor groan nor sigh, I can’t look away, Lord knows I’ve tried, From the curse of a dead man’s eye.
4.
Oh sweet William Frend, Who can condemn? When, Oh sweet William Frend, We stand as equal men? Oh as equal men, Oh as equal men, Oh as equal men! And oh sweet William Frend, They’ll not condemn when They all glorious rise again And stand as equal men! Oh as equal men, Oh as equal men, Oh as equal men! Rise and stand for liberty, Applause will sound in the balcony, So rise and stand for liberty, Applause will sound in the balcony, So rise and stand for liberty of men! Oh sweet William Frend, Who can condemn? When, Oh sweet William Frend, We stand as equal men! Oh as equal men, Oh as equal men, Oh as equal men! So rise and stand for liberty, Applause will sound in the balcony, So rise and stand for liberty, Applause will sound in the balcony, So rise and stand for liberty of men!
5.
On a cold and careless winter’s morn’ With quill and coat adorned, Take to the hills all for to walk All over the heathery moorland. The climb, the hill, the rustic path, The broken wall beside us And to the open skies at last We on the moors resided. And in the upward Quantock breeze Where proud the beacon rises, We look toward the icy sea And to the shores of Cardiff. The climb, the hill, the rustic path, The broken wall beside us And to the open skies at last We on the moors resided. Sir Wordsworth he will walk with me To talk of all besides us, The sweet and lovely Dorothy Between our words will guide us. The climb, the hill, the rustic path, The broken wall beside us And to the open skies at last We on the moors resided. And so the days we friends of three With all the Lord provided, Will spend in splendid company And all of life confided. The climb, the hill, the rustic path, The broken wall beside us And to the open skies at last We on the moors resided.
6.
04:01
In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree: Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. So twice five miles of fertile ground With walls and towers were girdled round; And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills, Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree; And here were forests ancient as the hills, Enfolding sunny spots of greenery. But oh! that deep romantic chasm which slanted Down the green hill athwart a cedarn cover! A savage place! as holy and enchanted As e’er beneath a waning moon was haunted By woman wailing for her demon-lover! And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething, As if this earth in fast thick pants were breathing, A mighty fountain momently was forced: Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail, Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher’s flail: And mid these dancing rocks at once and ever It flung up momently the sacred river. Five miles meandering with a mazy motion Through wood and dale the sacred river ran, Then reached the caverns measureless to man, And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean; And ’mid this tumult Kubla heard from far Ancestral voices prophesying war! The shadow of the dome of pleasure Floated midway on the waves; Where was heard the mingled measure From the fountain and the caves. It was a miracle of rare device, A sunny pleasure-dome with caves of ice! A damsel with a dulcimer In a vision once I saw: It was an Abyssinian maid And on her dulcimer she played, Singing of Mount Abora. Could I revive within me Her symphony and song, To such a deep delight ’twould win me, That with music loud and long, I would build that dome in air, That sunny dome! those caves of ice! And all who heard should see them there, And all should cry, Beware! Beware! His flashing eyes, his floating hair! Weave a circle round him thrice, And close your eyes with holy dread For he on honey-dew hath fed, And drunk the milk of Paradise.
7.
02:10
Who am I my brother, My earliest friend, That you be a father to me? For the prayers of your heart To upon me descend As the prayers of your first bended knee. Oh the prayers of a young and unquestioning heart, Where hope calms the fiercest of seas. Who am I my brother, My earliest friend, That you be a father to me? Who am I my brother, My earliest friend, To ask of your patience, and plea For a love that will conquer forgive and defend When discordant my own mind should be? Oh the prayers of a young And unquestioning heart, Where hope calms the fiercest of seas. Who am I my brother, My earliest friend, That you be a father to me? Who am I my brother, My earliest friend, That you be a father to me? For the prayers of your heart To upon me descend As the prayers of your first bended knee. For the prayers of a young And unquestioning heart, Where hope calms the fiercest of seas. Who am I my brother, My earliest friend, That you be a father to me?
8.
02:13
Three sons and daughters, girls and men, Each to marry a courter, Vowed to leave all they had and prepare To go and live by the water. Three wives and husbands, all as friends, Each to found a new order, Vowed to work in the wide open When they live out by the water. Oh one for Edith young and free, And one for lovely Mary, One for Sara who will be The girl that I shall marry. Three sons and daughters, girls and men, Each to start an uprising, Vowed to prosper good will to men All by new waters residing. Three wives and husbands, all as friends, Each to leave all they own, for they Vowed to work in the wide open and Build a life by the water. Oh one for Edith young and free, And one for lovely Mary, One for Sara who will be The girl that I shall marry. Three sons and daughters, girls and men, Each to walk up the alter, Vowed to leave all they had and prepare To go and live by the water. Three wives and husbands fall as friends Pantisocracy falters… Vowed to work in the wide open but Couldn’t agree on the waters! Oh one for Edith young and free, And one for lovely Mary, One for Sara who will be The girl that I shall marry.
9.
Ere sin could blight or Sorrow fade Death came with friendly care The opening bud to Heaven conveyed And bade it blossom there This lovely bud, so young so fair, Called hence by early doom, Just came to show how sweet a flower In paradise would bloom.
10.
It is a sombre story, one to you I now bequeath, of phantom visions, apparitions, and all that lies beneath! How few now told before me will a victim of you find; Oh hear my tale and listen well, for might is in the mind! A man in university at only twenty-two Would not believe in ghostly fiends, would not be found a fool. But he who tempts the trickster will face a fate unkind, Oh hear my tale, listen well, for might is in the mind. One night our young strong headed man was sleeping in his bed When a friend did come and took his gun, removed from it the lead. He stood all dressed in white and cried a ghostly chime, Oh hear my tale, listen well, for might is in the mind! The man awoke from slumber, took up his bedside gun: “So false you are you’ve gone to far, back down my friend be gone!” But neither would surrender, both to their fates were blind, Oh hear my tale, listen well , for might is in the mind. He tried to scare the trickster but movement there was none and at long last when patience passed, he shot him with his gun! The trickster stood in silence and neither bled nor died, Oh hear my tale, listen well, for might is in the mind. Our young man he did tear his hair, his teeth did gnash and grind, Fell to the floor, convulsed in awe, was rendered mute and blind. Believed the apparition and fell to his demise, Oh hear my tale, listen well for might is in the mind!
11.
On a hill in the valley where the Otter flows (All for to cause to grieve Mother you will rue me) A chill and child and calf doth low (All for to cause to grieve Mother you will rue me) Where only a torrid thorn warms my bones (All for to cause to grieve Mother you will rue me) And the prayers of a shilling book make my moan (All for to cause to grieve Mother you will rue me) All for to cause to grieve Mother I escape thee Run from my brothers and deceive all of Ottery Frozen and motionless Mother you will find me All for to cause to grieve none of you will bind me You call on the crier for to call me home (All for to cause to grieve Mother you will rue me) And the blade of a rotting tale sealed unknown (All for to cause to grieve Mother you will rue me) On a hill in the valley where the river flows (All for to cause to grieve Mother you will rue me) A chill and child and calf doth low (All for to cause to grieve Mother you will rue me) All for to cause to grieve Mother I escape thee. Run from my brothers and deceive all of Ottery Frozen and motionless Mother you will find me All for to cause to grieve none of you will bind me.
12.
03:11
Four angels are here for my keeping Stand Matthew, Mark, Luke and John How I pray for a weak Esteesee God bless the bed I lie on. All in awe as the floor falls beneath me Stand demons and ghosts at my door How I pray for God’s angels to keep me God bless the bed I lie on. I am bound for my horrors and weeping For my servitude barren and poor How I pray God have mercy for grieving God bless the bed I lie on. Four corners to my bed, Four angels round my head; One to watch and one to pray Two to bear my soul away. Four corners to my bed, Four angels round my head; One to watch and one to pray Two to bear my soul away. Four angels are here for my keeping Stand Matthew Mark Luke and John How I pray for a weak Esteesee God bless the bed I lie on.
13.
All for you Sir, all for you fine Sir The awakening and the rising of the day. All for you Sir, all for you fine Sir I will walk along the Coleridge Way. I’ll walk the trodden line fine Sir, Form your work in words of mine fine Sir. All for you Sir, all for you fine Sir The awakening and the rising of the day. All for you Sir, all for you fine Sir I will walk along the Coleridge Way. In the moving of the times fine Sir, Your words will rise through mine fine Sir. All for you Sir, all for you fine Sir The awakening and the rising of the day. All for you Sir, all for you fine Sir I will walk along the Coleridge Way.
14.
Each is the life the Lord has made And each from the womb of a mother came All who live will go by grave As all who fall before thee. Come pray that he who toils of breath As death in life finds life in death Ask and hope through Christ in rest As he who falls before thee. Each is a day the Lord has made And each with the mother of my children paved Each of our boys both bright and brave Two sons and one fine daughter. Come Pray that he who toils of breath As death in life finds life in death Ask and hope through Christ in rest As he who falls before thee. Each is the hour the Lord has made And each with my brother is a joyous trade Mine mere words where his are ways Two sons and one as father. Come pray that he who toils of breath As death in life finds life in death Ask and hope through Christ in rest As he who falls before thee. Come pray that he who toils of breath As death in life finds life in death Ask and hope through Christ in rest As he who falls before thee.

about

Ange Hardy’s fourth studio album is a folk project inspired by the life and work of the romantic poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge. The album is called ‘Esteesee’ and is pronounced ‘Ess-Tee-See’ (forming the initials of the poet S.T.C). These 14 new folk songs were written in January 2015 and they include songs inspired by Coleridge’s relationships with friends, family and acquaintances, verses of his poetry set to music, new songs inspired by his characters and stories, and even tales based on fragments of his dinner table conversations.

Ange’s music has always been deeply personal and often autobiographical, this project sees Ange stepping outside the familiar comfort zone of her own experiences and into the life of another.

As well as featuring the talents of Ange Hardy on guitar, traditional whistle, harp, and vocals the album is complemented by a roster of world class folk musicians including Steve Knightley (‘Show of Hands’) providing guest vocals, the spectacular Patsy Reid (founding member of ‘Breabach’) on fiddle, viola and cello, Lukas Drinkwater on double bass, Archie Churchill-Moss on diatonic accordion, Jonny Dyer on the piano, Jo May providing percussion, Andrew Pearce on the drums, Kate Rouse as the damsel with the hammered dulcimer, Steve Pledger on backing vocals, and poetry readings from David Milton (the Watchet town crier) and the wonderful Tamsin Rosewell (broadcaster and artist).

Since winning the FATEA Female Vocalist of the Year award in January 2014 Ange Hardy has established an enviable reputation as one of the fastest emerging folk acts in the UK, a position cemented by her BBC Radio 2 Folk Award nomination this year. Her third studio album ‘The Lament of The Black Sheep” was one of only three folk albums last year to be awarded 5-stars by The Telegraph. Bringing the story full circle it was in January 2015 awarded FATEA’s most prestigious award of all, Album of the Year, in the same week that Mike Harding referred to Ange Hardy as “one of the most interesting, powerful and talented singers and songwriters to come out of the last couple of years”.

The songs for this project were written with the support of public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England, who supported Ange with grant funding to write and present 14 nights of music entitled “Along the Coleridge Way” at rural venues that follow the route of the Coleridge Way in Somerset and Devon between October 3rd and October 18th 2015.

The album will be released under the Story Records label on September 24th 2015, with a release concert at Halsway Manor on October 4th as part of that tour.

The next year is already starting to look very busy for Ange Hardy. Having performed this year at Cambridge Folk Festival, Sidmouth Folk Week, Sark Folk Festival and may others. For 2015 Ange has been awarded a creative artist residency by EFDSS, the English Folk Dance and Song Society.

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released September 24, 2015

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Ange Hardy England, UK

Nominated for the Horizon Award for best emerging talent at the 2015 BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards, Ange Hardy is a folk singer, songwriter and recording artist from West Somerset, England. Ange performs original contemporary songs written in a traditional style with an emphasis on vocal harmony. ... more

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